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Identity, community and care in online accounts of hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome

What it is like for people to undergo screening and monitoring for cancer when they have not been diagnosed with the disease itself? Read more »

This entry was posted in Blog, Cancer Patienthood project.

The Sociology of Cancer

Thesp members’ new article questions the widely accepted view that biomedical research is straightforwardly driving improvements in cancer care, demonstrating the importance of social research about living with and beyond cancer in improving cancer services and reducing the risk of cancer. It also underlines the importance of journalists, public commentators and social researchers investigating and taking into account the different experiences and perspectives of a range of people affected by cancer so that their voices can be heard and services shaped to cater for their needs. Read more »

This entry was posted in Blog, Cancer Patienthood project.

Online discussions of Oncotype DX testing in early-stage breast cancer

Emily Ross, Julia Swallow, Anne Kerr and Sarah Cunningham-Burley discuss how ‘personalising’ patients’ cancer care through Oncotype DX has mixed results for patients’ decision making about their care. Read more »

This entry was posted in Blog, Cancer Patienthood project.

Genomic medicine: Patients’, practitioners’ and family members’ hopes for the future. Initial findings from the “Cancer and Society in the 21st Century” project

Choon Key Chekar reports the initial findings from the “Cancer and Society in the 21st Century” project. Read more »

This entry was posted in Blog, Cancer Patienthood project.

It’s Been Emotional: Managing Suffering In Organ Donation

Stephanie Parsons (Anglia Ruskin University) shares findings from her research, originally presented at the Leeds conference “Boundaries, Bodies, Borders: The Global Movement of Body Parts”. Read more »

This entry was posted in Blog.

In Pursuit of Affordable Organ Transplants: Reflections from India

Abin Thomas (King’s College London) discusses affordable organ transplant in India, in light of the changing political and financial situation of the country, thereby continuing a conversation started at the “Boundaries, Bodies, Borders: The Global Movement of Body Parts” event, held at the University of Leeds on 5th May 2017. Read more »

This entry was posted in Blog.

Child medical travel in Argentina

Cecilia Vindrola-Padros (Department of Applied Health Research, University College London) writes on body parts provision and medical travel, continuing a conversation started at the “Boundaries, Bodies, Borders: The Global Movement of Body Parts” event, held at the University of Leeds on 5th May 2017. Read more »

This entry was posted in Blog.

Sugar Rush: Science, Obesity and the Social Life of Sugar

Karen Throsby explains how sugar has become the new public health bête noir and discusses her new research project exploring scientific knowledge production, validation and popular appropriation; the role of generation, gender, race an class in the production of embodied citizenship; the politics of food in the context of austerity; and  contemporary panics around health and body size. Read more »

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The Kadcyla debate and the future of targeted cancer drugs

Julia Swallow  discusses the complexities of measuring cost-effectiveness for treatments that target sub-types of cancer, focusing on the recent debate around NHS funding for Kadcyla (trastuzumab emtansine), a targeted breast cancer drug. Read more »

This entry was posted in Blog.

Considering Risks and Benefits in MS Treatment Selection (CRIMSON)

Ana Manzano is the principal investigator on the CRIMSON project, which aims to find out how people recently diagnosed with MS make decisions about their treatment. Read more »

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